Everything You Need to Know About Birding

Hummingbird Migration

Jun 4, 2019 3:59:00 PM / by Amanda Joest posted in Hummingbirds

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A few years ago, we posted information about Hummingbird Migration, but did you know that since the last time the Hummingbird Guide has taken on the ambitious task of documenting Hummingbird "last sightings"? Similar to the interactive maps available for first sightings in the spring, they request birders to send in information on when they spot the last Hummingbirds of the season. 

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Summer Bird Feeding Tips and Tricks!

May 16, 2019 3:49:00 PM / by Amanda Joest posted in Hummingbirds, Bird Feeding

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As the temperature climbs higher, our yards tend to fill with the sounds of birds. Yet summer feeding is often a challenge for even the most experienced birders. Here are some tricks of the trade, along with a few facts and myths: 

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Bird Feeding Masterclass: Selecting Food

Mar 30, 2018 10:05:00 AM / by Amanda Joest posted in Birding Tips, Hummingbirds, Bird Watching

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Over the years, we have provided a lot of tips and tricks so that you can get the most out of your bird feeding experience. Here we have gathered all of that information in one 4-part series. This information is helpful for both the seasoned birder and the beginner, and takes you through the feeding process from start to finish. 

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Bye-Bye, Birdie!

Jul 16, 2015 5:02:00 PM / by Amanda Joest posted in Birding Tips, Hummingbirds, Bird Feeding

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Summer is quickly coming to a close and for many of us, that means cooler weather, trudging back to school, and saying good-bye to our colorful summer visitors. Several species of Hummingbirds are either gearing up to leave or have already started moving into their winter homes. These tiny, mysterious creatures each have their own unique path they have followed for generations. Thanks to observant, dedicated birders, their flight paths have been documented so that enthusiasts can anticipate their peak viewing times. When can you expect a visit from these "Flying Jewels?" 

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Make Way for Hummingbirds!

May 20, 2015 11:15:00 AM / by Amanda Joest posted in Birding Tips, Hummingbirds, How to attract Hummingbirds, Bird Feeding

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Can Your Garden Attract the Birds You Love?

Feb 27, 2015 5:01:00 PM / by Amanda Joest posted in "Garden Tips", Birding Tips, Bluebirds, Hummingbirds, How to attract Hummingbirds

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The countdown for spring has begun (for me, it started the first time the thermometer plunged below freezing)! It isn’t too early to start planning for your garden. Put your yard to work this year by growing the plants that attract your favorite birds. Read on for a list of popular backyard birds and the plants they love.


Hummingbirds: According to Bird Watcher’s Digest, gardening for Hummingbirds is among the easiest of all bird species. The list is long and includes plants and flowers that beginning gardeners (or those of us whose green thumb leaves something to be desired) can grow with little effort. Southern states and the Pacific coast can expect to offer plants year-round, while colder climates should plan for a summer garden when hummers are most prevalent.

Look for plants with red or pink cone-shaped blossoms, and check seed packets or nurseries to determine how well the plant will grow in your region.

Flowers Trees Shrubs Vines
Bergamot Buckeye Azalea Trumpet Honeysuckle
Bleeding Heart Citrus  Flowering Quince Red Morning Glory
Canna Lily  Flowering Crabapple Hibiscus Trumpet Creeper
Columbine Tulip Poplar    
Daylily      
Fuchsia      
Hollyhock      
Salvia      
Snapdragon      
Zinnia      

Adding attractive hummingbird feeders among these plants will help you get the most out of your feeder and the effort you put into planting. However, please be aware that Hummingbirds and bees are attracted to similar plants.


Bluebirds: Bluebirds are attracted to various trees and shrubs both for the food that they provide and shelter. When selecting your plants, keep in mind that some varieties require both the male and female plant to produce the fruit that attracts the Bluebirds.

 

 

Male/Female Plant Required Trees Shrubs Vines
American Holly Eastern Red, Rocky Mt Cedar American Blackberry American Bittersweet
Black Tupelo Black, Pin Cherry Gray, Red-oiser, Silky Dogwood Wild Grape
Deciduous Holly Flowering, Alternate-leaf Dogwood Pasture Rose Mistletoe
Common Winterberry Red Mulberry Smooth, Staghorn Sumac Virginia Creeper

Growing a combination of trees, shrubs, and vines, along with offering specific bluebird feeders and houses, and a water source will help attract these beautiful songbirds to your yard.



Be sure to leave some room in your garden or landscape design for feeders, shelter, and a water source for any bird you hope to attract! 

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